Grange shadowing

Young agriculturalists are often encouraged to seek internships or work for another farm before returning to the family farm. The object is to provide the aspiring farmer a chance to see how other farms operate. They learn practices they like or get hands on experience with a process or management practice they are considering implementing at home. They also learn how it is to work for others and gather some practical experience.

Aspiring farmers often pick up apprenticeships for some hands on experience.

How does this fit into our Grange experience? The question, “how to do we…” is one I often hear as Grangers are seeking ideas to create new programs, generate excitement among their members or building their local youth program. I am a big believer in hands-on learning, so spending time with a neighboring Grange to learn about one of their successful programs or how they create that excitement among their members could provide some tips and ideas to take home. Thus, “Grange shadowing.”

This does not mean your Grange or youth department has to morph into an exact replica of the Grange you are shadowing. Instead, like these young farmers, you see what practices, activities and ideas could work at your Grange and what ones might not. The goal is how to advance your Grange for future success.

Grange shadowing could be more than just attending meetings. It could include volunteering at an event they organize that you are interested in bringing to your home Grange. If your Grange does not participate in a visitation program, usually among Granges in a Pomona, create a hybrid of the idea. Find a “sister” Grange you could develop a relationship with. The ideas are limitless.

 

Tie Dye – A Grange Activity for the Ages

Tie Dye is something that has come in and out of style through the decades. Just when I think its out, it comes back again. The first time I completed a tie dye project was in art class in middle school. The teacher had multiple vats of dye for the students to dip their rubber-banned shirts into. Same again in 4-H.

Today, there are kits and multiple ideas on how to tie dye shirts. It’s actually a great activity for Grange youth and juniors. First, the kits give plenty of ideas on how to dye shirts. And, many use spray bottles or squeeze bottles to apply the dye. The benefit is you can leave the shirts absorb more of the dye to make more vibrant colors.

You can pick up a kit at Wal-Mart or a local craft store. Many offer larger kits for groups. Or go old school and purchase Rit dye, fill containers with the needed tye and water mixture. Go wild.

Need pattern ideas- check out ideas on Pintrest, Youtube, or through a Google search. It also can go beyond a basic t-shirt. Or for a twist, instead of plain white shirts, make Grange shirts that can be dyed.

Check out ideas and share your tie-dye creations on our Facebook page.

Freeda’s Findings: Summertime fun

Freeda the Mouse. The official mascot of the National Grange Youth Department.

Freeda the Mouse. The official mascot of the National Grange Youth Department.

Summer is here. What events does your Grange have organized to make this summer memorable? Will your Pomona Grange have a picnic? Or is your local Grange planning for a night at the ballpark? For a youth event – will you host an outdoor movie night or play a round of miniature golf? Or organize a homemade ice cream fundraiser?

If there is one thing summer brings, it’s a time to kick back, have fun and enjoy time with your fellow Grangers.

I am packing my bags for several regional youth and leadership conferences. I hope to see many of you in Texas, Indiana, New Hampshire, North Carolina and Montana!

 

Until next time,

— Freeda

Searching for Inspiration? Ideas for Vespers

campfire

If you have ever been tapped to organize a vespers service or Sunday morning inspirational pause, it can either be easy or a challenge.

These are important because they allow a calming point in the day, allowing for reflection, connection of the campers, creating memories, and reinforcement of what connects Grangers together.

With some preplanning, inspiration programs can create a meaningful experience for all involved. Many times, youth ambassadors, young couples are asked to organize these events or the state Grange chaplain. However if you find yourself in charge, here are some helpful tips from the Montana 4-H’s Survival Guide for 4-H Camp Leaders.

(For a full copy, go here: http://montana4h.org/#resource:Support_Materials, click on Camp Survival Guide for pdf of the booklet.)

Hopefully, these tips can help you along.

Tips for Planning Inspirational Programs

1. You can use humor and set a light mood with meaning but be careful not to let laughter take over. It is easier to make someone cry than to make them laugh.

2. Vespers do not have to occur at a specific vesper site. The space needs to be big enough for everyone to see, hear and stand or sit comfortably. Distractions give campers a perfect excuse to be distracted.

3. Make content developmentally appropriate.

4. Involve as many campers as possible. If only a few can be readers, the rest can lead a song or give leadership to special activities.

5. Call on other leaders to assist – their leadership can be of great help. If you are doing something unusual, review it at your leader meetings.

6. Have other leaders scattered throughout the campers – a gentle tap on the back or arm can remind campers to be quiet or, a leader can also slide in quietly and sit between two rowdy campers.

7. If you have a standard tradition for going/coming to vespers, review it with the campers.

For example – When campers (in pairs) get to the bridge it is a signal to get quiet, remove hats and remain quiet till you return to the bridge on the way back.

Leaders can assist – station them to guide campers and reinforce appropriate behavior.

8. Utilize the special talents of campers – a singer, a dancer, someone who knows sign language. Words are not essential to impart meaning to the ceremony.

9. Words and music are the most common methods of inspiration. A better way to show the beauty of nature may to have a few minutes of silence to allow campers to reflect and “discover.”

10. Be creative!!! You may want to use different types of drama such as plays, or role playing.

11. Be prepared for rainy days (alternate dry locations need to be determined ahead of time).

12. For group singing, select familiar songs so that song sheets are unnecessary.

13. Seat campers close together.

14. Pre-vesper music creates the mood. (CD player or digital music docking station)

15. You may want your first vesper program for younger camps to be conducted by leaders so campers will understand what is expected of them.

16. Use a small portable microphone – it helps little voices be heard and keeps the group engaged.

17. Work with other groups – if you leave the flag ceremony to go to vespers, have the flag group assist. Ask song leaders to teach or practice a particular song you want to use.

18. Help prepare campers for these activities – allow them time to get a coat if going to candlelighting, make sure they have mosquito repellent or take some other appropriate action.

Grange Youth Camp Ideas

Youth Camp is one of the most popular events for our youth members. And, it’s a challenge to come up with new ideas for activities for these schedules. There are some tried and true events, friendship circles, campfires and s’mores. But here are some activity ideas from my Pintrest finds and other resources that might provide a unique twist on programing.

m&m get aquainted game

M&M game theme ideas

M&M get acquainted game: Pass around a bag of M&Ms and have everyone grab a handful of candies. Then, for each M&M, based on its color, they have to share something with the group. A good idea if you are limited in space or have a quiet group. You can come up with your own topics for each color or use the ideas in the photo in this post.

Sign language alphabet quotes: Looking for a deaf awareness/sign language activity for your schedule? This website has several alphabet sign language quote worksheets. The youth identify the sign to crack the code of the quote. They can be downloaded here: http://www.education.com/worksheet/article/sign-language-practice-9/. Just note, you will need to sign in with Facebook or make a sign in to download the sheets.

glow in the dark bowling

Glow in the Dark Bowling

Glow in the Dark Bowling: Fill 10 2- liter bottles with water. Activate 10 glow sticks and place them in the bottles of water to make the glow in the dark pins. Use a soccer ball to “bowl.” If the pins are too hard to roll over, fill only halfway.

Recycled crafts idea: This posting shows more than 20 items that can be made from a cereal box. http://www.buzzfeed.com/pippa/cereal-box-diys-5ocb?sub=2496890_1478682 Several ideas are pretty simple to do, others could be achieved with additional planning.

Agriculture activities: Utilize members of your local extension office to lead an agriculture-themed activity. Master Gardners can teach basic gardening tips. Or tour a nearby farm to learn more about how they operate and their related industries.

Social Media Safety: Invite someone from your attorney general’s office to speak about personal safety when using social media. These topics include privacy tips and to think before posting.

Organize a “Fuel Up to Play 60” event. Fuel Up to Play 60 is a dairy checkoff program that ties into the “Play 60” program of the NFL. The concept is to target the message of eating healthy and playing outside for 60 minutes per day. Local checkoff programs could provide supplies and activity ideas. To find your local dairy checkoff program work with a dairy farmer Grange member or find your local program here: http://www.dairy.org/local-checkoff  To learn more about “Fuel Up to Play 60” go here: http://fueluptoplay60.com/

Pool Noodle “Olympics” Use pool noodles to create obstacle courses. It’s amazing what you can make with some creativity, pool noodles and other basic supplies.To learn more go here:

rings

Pool Ring Olympics

http://www.parents.com/fun/activities/outdoor/pool-noodle-backyard-games/?page=5

Also, don’t forget to use the achievement award programs in the youth handbook. Activities could assist members with earning seals.

Have a great youth activity/idea – please share with Charlene Shupp Espenshade at [email protected].

Finding what you love, and using your voice

Charlene Espenshade pictured with Greg Peterson of the Peterson Farm Bros.

Charlene Espenshade pictured with Greg Peterson of the Peterson Farm Bros.

I had the unique experience to meet Greg Peterson from the Peterson Bros. this past weekend. In case you are wondering who is Greg Peterson, he’s one of the trio of brothers who produced a viral video called, “I’m Farming and I Know It” based off the hit song, I’m Sexy and I Know It by LMFAO.

Peterson spoke at the Pennsylvania Holstein Association’s banquet in State College, Pa. on Friday, Feb. 28. Armed with just a basic video camera and some simple recording equipment, they crafted the video during wheat harvest on their Kansas farm. Peterson said the first scene they filmed was at 6 a.m. one morning of them walking through a wheat field. After that shot, the boys decided they wanted to film an “epic” video. They joked that wouldn’t it be great if we could reach 50,000 hits on You Tube. The result was far greater than they could imagine. Today, it has more than 9 million views.

By the second day after posting the finished product, they started getting local attention, with an interview by the local newspaper who had heard the buzz around town about the video they did. The third day, they got started their work day finding all of the local news media vans in their farm driveway asking for interviews. This was followed by a call from Fox News asking them to come to New York City to appear the next morning at their studios to talk about the video. All the while, the video has climbed to several million views. They worked with their dad to find people to cover their work as they traveled to New York City for the day. The madness was topped by interviews from the Associated Press and features in the LA Times, USA Today and other newspapers.

He said they never imagined what followed, but that video has been followed by other successful parodies using popular music to promote agriculture.

Peterson who majored in agriculture communications and minored in music at Kansas State said one of the keys to success with their venture was it was something they were passionate about music and agriculture. The venture has opened many opportunities for the boys as they have traveled to state, national and international conferences to speak about their project. It has also provided Peterson with a great business for a recent college graduate. He spends most of his time home at the farm working with his dad on the family’s beef and crop farm, but travels about once a week, speaking about agriculture advocacy.

What are you passionate about and how can you use those talents and passions for Grange? Connecting those two items could open doors or career opportunities for you, just like it did for the Peterson Bros.

To view their videos go to:

You Tube: http://www.youtube.com/thepetersonfarmbros

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PetersonFarmBros

 

 

— Charlene Shupp Espenshade, National Grange Youth Director

Freeda Findings: Promoting Grange Youth

Charlene and I have spent plenty of time talking about how do we raise awareness to Grange youth and young adult opportunities in the community or subordinate Grange. Because, it’s the local Grange, that has the greatest impact on encouraging Grange Youth and Young adults.

In about six weeks, Grange Month will be here. We both think what a great opportunity Grange month provides for Grange Youth and Young Adults to have a lot of fun, encourage others to join their Grange and the chance to show others the impact of a Grange on its local community.

What better way to promote the Granges ideals of American Values, Hometown Roots.?

Need some help getting started? Here are some ideas. Also feel free to share your other successful ideas.

1.         Have a food drive-in.

2.         Organize job shadow days with Grangers, for youth and others to learn about different careers in their communities.

3.         Work with local and school newspapers, radio and TV stations to run public service announcements highlighting local Grange activities.

4.         Host a “fun night” at the Grange Hall with games like “Minute-to-Win It” or other game show activities, invite friends to attend.

5.         Partner with other local agriculture organizations to host a farm/city exchange between a local farm family and government official/local media personality. Host a Farm/City dinner/reception at the Grange to hear from both groups about their experiences.

6.         Work with elementary school students or your Junior Grangers to plant a tree—or two – in honor of Grange month.

7.         Hold a Grange Open House for the community and conduct interactive activities for participants.

8.         Connect with our agricultural heritage, host an ag career day to learn about different job opportunities. Invite local speakers, farmers, Extension agents, agribusiness owners and managers. Statistics show this will be an employment growth industry for young people.

9.         Conduct a “Flat Stanley” contest for members to photograph their Stanley at different Grange events.

10.       Organize a community clean-up campaign.

11.       Invite your state Grange youth royalty to speak at a community Grange meeting or participate in a local Grange event.

12.       Work with a local FFA chapter on a joint community service or agricultural awareness activity.

13.       Partner with other youth or young adult organizations on a community service project.

14.       Determine your “Top Ten Reasons” to join Grange and utilize them during an event to generate awareness to your Grange.

15.       Host a Grange movie night, invite the community to the Grange hall.

16.       Host food and clothing drives or other community-wide outreach.

17.       Tweet it. Post it. Like it up! Post your activities and encourage them to go viral through Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

18.       Organize a school supply or toy drive.

19.       Create a fun video of Grange youth/young adult activities, post the video online and use to promote your local Grange’s impact.

20.       Put on a petting zoo, pedal tractor pull or coloring contest for elementary students.

Invite non-members to a meeting.

21.       Host a dance in your Grange Hall or organize a barn dance.

22.       Look into hosting events like a lock-in, pizza party, movie night, bowling, karaoke, and more.

23.       Have a local mayor and/or other community officials sign a Grange Month Proclamation.

24.       Present a community service award/ honorary membership awards to a Grange youth supporter.

25.       . Volunteer for a day with Habitat for Humanity.

26.       Host a bowl-a-thon, raise funds for the National Grange Youth Foundation.

27.       Organize a celebrity “cook off” – could be chili, ice cream, or other local food specialty – invite the community in to sample the entries, and select a winner.

28.       Organize a “youth/young adult officer” night. Let youth and young adult Grange members run a Grange meeting.

29.       Invite your state youth director or youth committee member to speak at a Grange meeting about state youth/young adult events/opportunities.

30.       Invite your state master and Grange herd partner to speak with your Grange youth. Get a photo with their Grange herd mascot and share on my Facebook page.

Freeda the Mouse. The official mascot of the National Grange Youth Department.

Freeda the Mouse. The official mascot of the National Grange Youth Department.

Freeda Findings: Ponderings from the National Grange Youth Mascot

Greetings Grangers! I hope everyone has had a great weekend and is looking ahead to a positive week. For those who don’t know who I am, I am the Grange Herd representative assigned to help grow the National Grange Youth Department.

I have been settled in at my new home in Pennsylvania with National Grange Youth Director, Charlene Shupp Espenshade. I have not been to as many meetings as some of my fellow herd mates, but Charlene has kept me busy working on ideas for the National Grange Youth Department.

Looking around Charlene’s house mixed in with all of her Grange items are things from a fraternity she belonged to in college. Actually there were two, one was Kappa Alpha Theta, a member of the Panhellenic Council, the second was Alpha Zeta, an honorary, agricultural fraternity. It was interesting to learn about both of these organizations.

One item I found interesting is how often she wore her letters for the two organizations. Charlene said that especially with Kappa Alpha Theta, on Fridays, they would have either – “dress to pin” or letter day. On dress to pin days, she said members would dress up, usually in business casual and wear their fraternity pin. On letter day, the members would wear a shirt with their fraternity letters on them. The idea was to promote awareness of the chapter on campus.

I, of course, was fascinated. It also got me thinking. Why couldn’t Grange youth have their own version of this? Proper attire for attending a Grange meeting requires members wear a Grange emblem, tie tack or pin. Why could that not work amongst the public?

I have asked Charlene about the idea of establishing a “Grange dress day” where Grange youth and young adults would be encouraged to show their Grange pride one day a month. She says it’s a good idea, but she needs more feedback as to what others think. I think selecting the third Friday of the month might be a good idea for a National date, plus local and state Granges encourage “Grange dress days” the day of a Grange event or the day before if heading off to a state Grange event. Thoughts? Leave a comment here.

Also, don’t forget to “like” my Facebook pageFreeda.