Granges Earn Distinguished Grange Youth Program Status

Two community Granges and three state Granges earned the distinction of Distinguished Grange Youth Program. The program, in its third year, recognizes Grange youth departments that have gone above and beyond in their programming to help with youth leadership development, personal growth, community service and education.

“These Granges have competed outstanding programs of work this year,” said National Youth Development Director Charlene Shupp Espenshade. “They have crafted unique community service projects, tackled distinct needs within their communities and states and helped Grange youth to grow.”

This year’s winning programs are:

State winners are New York, North Carolina and Washington State.

Subordinate winners North Cameron Grange #355, New York and Humptulips Grange #730, Washington State.

Teambuilding idea: Marshmallow towers

School is out for the summer! With the warmer days, it means GRANGE YOUTH CAMP! Camp is a highlight for many Grangers and with it comes the challenge of balancing fun, memories and leadership skills.

One of my favorite teambuilding projects is marshmallow towers. The idea is very basic, take the given tools in a bag and work with your group to create the tallest tower you can.

What do you need:

Supplies needed:

  • Spaghetti (uncooked)
  • Marshmallows
  • Paper plate
  • Prize or reward (optional)

Create teams of Grange youth between 4 to 8 Grangers.


Give each group some marshmallows and spaghetti. The goal of the exercise is to build the tallest tower possible out of the spaghetti and marshmallows.

Allow the students 10-15 minutes to accomplish this. The team that has the highest tower wins a prize.


Afterwards, you could have the groups discuss 1) how well did your team work together, 2) who most helped the group pursue its goal, 3) what role did you play in the group, and 4) what would you do differently if given a second chance at this activity?


The activity can be modified to use toothpicks, tested to see what tower can withstand the greatest amount of weight, etc. This activity also works well as an icebreaker by encouraging intermingling among the Grange youth.

Five steps for youth legislative involvement

On Tuesday, April 21, the Grange Youth Department hosted its monthly TeamSpeak meeting. Grange youth member Christopher Szkutak shared five points on how Grange youth can participate with grassroots advocacy.

Point #1 — If your community grange does not have a legislative director/chair volunteer to serve. If your Grange has a legislative chair, ask to join the legislative committee. It’s a chance to step up and learn more about issues impacting your community and share it with your fellow Grangers.

Point #2 — Help your Grange to organize a legislative night. If an election year, host a candidates forum instead. The non-partisan stance of the Grange is a value to many legislators. Grange halls are a great forum for legislators and candidates to share their ideas, goals and listen to the concerns of the community. Legislative nights also have a news value and can generate publicity for the Grange.

Point #3 — Review state and national Grange policy books. See if a resolution is needed on an issue. Do research beforehand to make sure every is accurate. If you need help writing a resolution, ask others for help. As one Granger suggested, hosting a workshop about resolution writing can help encourage youth and Grangers craft resolutions to send to Pomona and state Grange for consideration. The youth department also has an achievement seal program to recognize Grangers for their participation.

Point #4 — Participate in National Grange Youth legislative programs, such as the John Trimble Legislative Experience. The Trimble Legislative Experience or a state-level program, gives Grange youth and young adults a chance to have a front-row seat to the delegate process. Trimble youth participate on a national delegate committee and is seated with the national delegates. They also assist the National Grange Legislative department.

Point #5 – Organize a subordinate Grange lecturer’s program based off the Apathy Not Allowed. The program promotes the value of Grange members engaging in the voting process. The United States has one of the lowest voter turnouts of all developed countries. The program reminds Grangers that twice a year, through a primary and general election, they have a chance to impact who their elected officials are.




Freeda’s Findings: Summertime fun

Freeda the Mouse. The official mascot of the National Grange Youth Department.

Freeda the Mouse. The official mascot of the National Grange Youth Department.

Summer is here. What events does your Grange have organized to make this summer memorable? Will your Pomona Grange have a picnic? Or is your local Grange planning for a night at the ballpark? For a youth event – will you host an outdoor movie night or play a round of miniature golf? Or organize a homemade ice cream fundraiser?

If there is one thing summer brings, it’s a time to kick back, have fun and enjoy time with your fellow Grangers.

I am packing my bags for several regional youth and leadership conferences. I hope to see many of you in Texas, Indiana, New Hampshire, North Carolina and Montana!


Until next time,

— Freeda

Freeda’s Findings: The Value of One Member

Freeda the Mouse. The official mascot of the National Grange Youth Department.

Freeda the Mouse. The official mascot of the National Grange Youth Department.

Greetings Grangers! I hope you all had a great Grange Month, promoting our organization and working on your youth and young adult programs. I was looking through Charlene’s Grange files and came across this poem written by a Granger as a reminder on the power, or value, of one Granger to changing their Grange.

The Value Of One Member

Ten little Grangers standing in a line. One disliked the Master, then there were nine.

Nine ambitious Grangers offered to work late. One forgot her promise, and then there were eight.

Eight creative Grangers had ideas good as heaven. One lost enthusiasm, then there were seven.

Seven loyal Grangers got into a fix. They quarreled over projects, then there were six.

Six Grangers still remained with spirit and drive. One moved away, then there were five.

Five steadfast Grangers wished that there were more. One became indifferent, then there were four.

Four cheerful Grangers who never disagree, ‘til one complained of meetings, then there were three.

Three eager Grangers, what do they do? One got discouraged, then there were two.

Two lonely Grangers, our rhyme is nearly done. One joined a pep team and then there was one.

One faithful Granger was feeling rather blue, met with a neighbor, and then there were two.

Two earnest Grangers each enrolled one more, doubling their number, then there were four.

Four determined Grangers, just couldn’t wait, ‘til each one won another, then there were eight.

Eight excited Grangers signed up sixteen more. In six more verses, there’ll be a thousand twenty-four!!

— Author Unknown

So have you asked a friend to come to a Grange event? Or helped to develop a new Grange project to impact your community? If so, please let me know – I’d love you to hear your story.Until next time,



Freeda Findings: Promoting Grange Youth

Charlene and I have spent plenty of time talking about how do we raise awareness to Grange youth and young adult opportunities in the community or subordinate Grange. Because, it’s the local Grange, that has the greatest impact on encouraging Grange Youth and Young adults.

In about six weeks, Grange Month will be here. We both think what a great opportunity Grange month provides for Grange Youth and Young Adults to have a lot of fun, encourage others to join their Grange and the chance to show others the impact of a Grange on its local community.

What better way to promote the Granges ideals of American Values, Hometown Roots.?

Need some help getting started? Here are some ideas. Also feel free to share your other successful ideas.

1.         Have a food drive-in.

2.         Organize job shadow days with Grangers, for youth and others to learn about different careers in their communities.

3.         Work with local and school newspapers, radio and TV stations to run public service announcements highlighting local Grange activities.

4.         Host a “fun night” at the Grange Hall with games like “Minute-to-Win It” or other game show activities, invite friends to attend.

5.         Partner with other local agriculture organizations to host a farm/city exchange between a local farm family and government official/local media personality. Host a Farm/City dinner/reception at the Grange to hear from both groups about their experiences.

6.         Work with elementary school students or your Junior Grangers to plant a tree—or two – in honor of Grange month.

7.         Hold a Grange Open House for the community and conduct interactive activities for participants.

8.         Connect with our agricultural heritage, host an ag career day to learn about different job opportunities. Invite local speakers, farmers, Extension agents, agribusiness owners and managers. Statistics show this will be an employment growth industry for young people.

9.         Conduct a “Flat Stanley” contest for members to photograph their Stanley at different Grange events.

10.       Organize a community clean-up campaign.

11.       Invite your state Grange youth royalty to speak at a community Grange meeting or participate in a local Grange event.

12.       Work with a local FFA chapter on a joint community service or agricultural awareness activity.

13.       Partner with other youth or young adult organizations on a community service project.

14.       Determine your “Top Ten Reasons” to join Grange and utilize them during an event to generate awareness to your Grange.

15.       Host a Grange movie night, invite the community to the Grange hall.

16.       Host food and clothing drives or other community-wide outreach.

17.       Tweet it. Post it. Like it up! Post your activities and encourage them to go viral through Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

18.       Organize a school supply or toy drive.

19.       Create a fun video of Grange youth/young adult activities, post the video online and use to promote your local Grange’s impact.

20.       Put on a petting zoo, pedal tractor pull or coloring contest for elementary students.

Invite non-members to a meeting.

21.       Host a dance in your Grange Hall or organize a barn dance.

22.       Look into hosting events like a lock-in, pizza party, movie night, bowling, karaoke, and more.

23.       Have a local mayor and/or other community officials sign a Grange Month Proclamation.

24.       Present a community service award/ honorary membership awards to a Grange youth supporter.

25.       . Volunteer for a day with Habitat for Humanity.

26.       Host a bowl-a-thon, raise funds for the National Grange Youth Foundation.

27.       Organize a celebrity “cook off” – could be chili, ice cream, or other local food specialty – invite the community in to sample the entries, and select a winner.

28.       Organize a “youth/young adult officer” night. Let youth and young adult Grange members run a Grange meeting.

29.       Invite your state youth director or youth committee member to speak at a Grange meeting about state youth/young adult events/opportunities.

30.       Invite your state master and Grange herd partner to speak with your Grange youth. Get a photo with their Grange herd mascot and share on my Facebook page.

Freeda the Mouse. The official mascot of the National Grange Youth Department.

Freeda the Mouse. The official mascot of the National Grange Youth Department.

Freeda Findings: Ponderings from the National Grange Youth Mascot

Greetings Grangers! I hope everyone has had a great weekend and is looking ahead to a positive week. For those who don’t know who I am, I am the Grange Herd representative assigned to help grow the National Grange Youth Department.

I have been settled in at my new home in Pennsylvania with National Grange Youth Director, Charlene Shupp Espenshade. I have not been to as many meetings as some of my fellow herd mates, but Charlene has kept me busy working on ideas for the National Grange Youth Department.

Looking around Charlene’s house mixed in with all of her Grange items are things from a fraternity she belonged to in college. Actually there were two, one was Kappa Alpha Theta, a member of the Panhellenic Council, the second was Alpha Zeta, an honorary, agricultural fraternity. It was interesting to learn about both of these organizations.

One item I found interesting is how often she wore her letters for the two organizations. Charlene said that especially with Kappa Alpha Theta, on Fridays, they would have either – “dress to pin” or letter day. On dress to pin days, she said members would dress up, usually in business casual and wear their fraternity pin. On letter day, the members would wear a shirt with their fraternity letters on them. The idea was to promote awareness of the chapter on campus.

I, of course, was fascinated. It also got me thinking. Why couldn’t Grange youth have their own version of this? Proper attire for attending a Grange meeting requires members wear a Grange emblem, tie tack or pin. Why could that not work amongst the public?

I have asked Charlene about the idea of establishing a “Grange dress day” where Grange youth and young adults would be encouraged to show their Grange pride one day a month. She says it’s a good idea, but she needs more feedback as to what others think. I think selecting the third Friday of the month might be a good idea for a National date, plus local and state Granges encourage “Grange dress days” the day of a Grange event or the day before if heading off to a state Grange event. Thoughts? Leave a comment here.

Also, don’t forget to “like” my Facebook pageFreeda.