Grange Youth Camp Ideas

Youth Camp is one of the most popular events for our youth members. And, it’s a challenge to come up with new ideas for activities for these schedules. There are some tried and true events, friendship circles, campfires and s’mores. But here are some activity ideas from my Pintrest finds and other resources that might provide a unique twist on programing.

m&m get aquainted game

M&M game theme ideas

M&M get acquainted game: Pass around a bag of M&Ms and have everyone grab a handful of candies. Then, for each M&M, based on its color, they have to share something with the group. A good idea if you are limited in space or have a quiet group. You can come up with your own topics for each color or use the ideas in the photo in this post.

Sign language alphabet quotes: Looking for a deaf awareness/sign language activity for your schedule? This website has several alphabet sign language quote worksheets. The youth identify the sign to crack the code of the quote. They can be downloaded here: http://www.education.com/worksheet/article/sign-language-practice-9/. Just note, you will need to sign in with Facebook or make a sign in to download the sheets.

glow in the dark bowling

Glow in the Dark Bowling

Glow in the Dark Bowling: Fill 10 2- liter bottles with water. Activate 10 glow sticks and place them in the bottles of water to make the glow in the dark pins. Use a soccer ball to “bowl.” If the pins are too hard to roll over, fill only halfway.

Recycled crafts idea: This posting shows more than 20 items that can be made from a cereal box. http://www.buzzfeed.com/pippa/cereal-box-diys-5ocb?sub=2496890_1478682 Several ideas are pretty simple to do, others could be achieved with additional planning.

Agriculture activities: Utilize members of your local extension office to lead an agriculture-themed activity. Master Gardners can teach basic gardening tips. Or tour a nearby farm to learn more about how they operate and their related industries.

Social Media Safety: Invite someone from your attorney general’s office to speak about personal safety when using social media. These topics include privacy tips and to think before posting.

Organize a “Fuel Up to Play 60” event. Fuel Up to Play 60 is a dairy checkoff program that ties into the “Play 60” program of the NFL. The concept is to target the message of eating healthy and playing outside for 60 minutes per day. Local checkoff programs could provide supplies and activity ideas. To find your local dairy checkoff program work with a dairy farmer Grange member or find your local program here: http://www.dairy.org/local-checkoff  To learn more about “Fuel Up to Play 60” go here: http://fueluptoplay60.com/

Pool Noodle “Olympics” Use pool noodles to create obstacle courses. It’s amazing what you can make with some creativity, pool noodles and other basic supplies.To learn more go here:

rings

Pool Ring Olympics

http://www.parents.com/fun/activities/outdoor/pool-noodle-backyard-games/?page=5

Also, don’t forget to use the achievement award programs in the youth handbook. Activities could assist members with earning seals.

Have a great youth activity/idea – please share with Charlene Shupp Espenshade at [email protected].

Seahawks Player Provides Inspiration, Deaf Awareness

Seattle Seahawks player Derrick Coleman is a one-of-a-kind NFL player. He’s made national news this week, not as a member of a Super Bowl Bound team, but because he is legally deaf.

The national stir began with the release of a Duracell battery commercial. The commercial has reached more than 7.5 million hits.

The premise of the commercial focuses on his long road to overcome obstacles to achieve NFL greatness. While the commercial is geared to promote batteries, Coleman says it is so much more.

“It’s spreading awareness not just for the hearing impaired but for everybody,” Coleman said to the Associated Press. “Everybody has problems, but we can still do what we want to do.

“I’ve been doing this since I was in college. Like I always tell everybody, there might be 100 people in the room, but if one walks away knowing, ‘I can still chase the dream,’ that is all I care about. It’s heartwarming.”

In so many ways, Coleman’s story is exactly that, too. As a kid, he was a strong, fast athlete, but often was chosen last in pickup games because of the hearing aids. He also was picked on because of his deafness. But he’s never allowed it to be a handicap, as his place in the NFL confirms.

Coleman was a standout at UCLA before being picked up last winter by the Seattle Seahawks as a free agent. He’s proven his worth to the team, and continues to serve as inspiration to others about achieving their dreams.

The National Grange Youth Department, and National Grange, has long supported projects that raise awareness to deaf and hard of hearing. Both issues challenge rural America. Hearing loss of farmers, who spent their career working around loud equipment, is still a problem today. Young people are at risk by misuse of earbuds, playing music, videos too loud. And, for families with deaf or hard of hearing at home, assistance may not always be easily accessed.

Grange youth should take up the challenge this year to learn how to sign the sign language alphabet or learn how to sign a song to compete in their state sign-a-song contest. There are plenty of deaf educational resources available online.

While each Granger will pick a side in the 2014 Super Bowl, I believe every Granger should root for the awareness Coleman is bringing to a legacy issue of the Grange.

To see the Coleman video go here.

To learn about the William Ireland Deaf Achievement Award go here.