Great Plains Conference Challenges Grangers to Expand Their Horizons

Derek Snyder discusses how to prepare for a legislative meeting.

Derek Snyder discusses how to prepare for a legislative meeting.

Grangers were challenged to take a leap of faith at the 2015 Great Plains Regional Leadership/Youth Conference. Members participated in the challenge course at the Hesperus Camp, Hesperus, Colo.

Grangers had to choose one of three ways up the course to the platform about 20 feet in the air to take the zipline down the hill. Members could climb a rock wall, cargo net or up a pole with cleat hand/footholds.

“It was absolutely amazing to watch Grangers battle their fears to reach the top and then take the ‘leap of faith’ to go down the zip line,” said National Grange Youth Director Charlene Shupp Espenshade. “Other Grangers cheered members on as they tried to overcome difficulties to reach the top.”

Colorado State Grange organized this year’s conference. The event included a mix of workshops, activities and projects from the youngest junior Granger to adults. Junior Grangers worked on centerpieces for the National Grange Session Junior Breakfast.

National Grange Youth Ambassador Derek Snyder led an Apathy Not Allowed workshop

Grangers took on the challenge to ride a zip line.

Grangers took on the challenge to ride a zip line.

with Espenshade. Grangers chose to prepare a key request in support of rural broadband – showing how broadband access could improve education opportunities, business growth and access to critical medical care. They presented their viewpoint to “Congressman Snyder” who eventually agreed with their position.

National Membership Director Michael Martin presented a workshop on the ritualisic elements of the Grange.

Grangers also participated in the pubic speaking, sign-a-song and Grange Jeopardy contests.

Daniel Greer of Colorado topped the prepared speech contest earning the Best of Show award. Beth Simons of Colorado earned the Best of Show award in the sign-a-song contest.

Three Coloradoans qualified to represent the Great Plains Region in Grange Jeopardy, Daniel Greer, Beth Simons and Dominick Breton.

Photos from Great Plains Conference can be viewed at the National Grange Youth Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/nationalgrangeyouth?fref=ts.

 

 

Teambuilding idea: Marshmallow towers

School is out for the summer! With the warmer days, it means GRANGE YOUTH CAMP! Camp is a highlight for many Grangers and with it comes the challenge of balancing fun, memories and leadership skills.

One of my favorite teambuilding projects is marshmallow towers. The idea is very basic, take the given tools in a bag and work with your group to create the tallest tower you can.

What do you need:

Supplies needed:

  • Spaghetti (uncooked)
  • Marshmallows
  • Paper plate
  • Prize or reward (optional)

Create teams of Grange youth between 4 to 8 Grangers.

 

Give each group some marshmallows and spaghetti. The goal of the exercise is to build the tallest tower possible out of the spaghetti and marshmallows.

Allow the students 10-15 minutes to accomplish this. The team that has the highest tower wins a prize.

 

Afterwards, you could have the groups discuss 1) how well did your team work together, 2) who most helped the group pursue its goal, 3) what role did you play in the group, and 4) what would you do differently if given a second chance at this activity?

 

The activity can be modified to use toothpicks, tested to see what tower can withstand the greatest amount of weight, etc. This activity also works well as an icebreaker by encouraging intermingling among the Grange youth.

Spreading the Word About Ag

Cassidy Cheddar

National Grange Youth Ambassador

Cassidy Cheddar, 2014-15 National Grange Youth Ambassador

Cassidy Cheddar, 2014-15 National Grange Youth Ambassador

We all know the importance of agriculture in our everyday lives; it provides us with food, clothing, and shelter that we would not be able to function without. But just because we know about it, doesn’t mean that everyone else does. I once assisted with a program where fifth graders rotated through stations about food production. I was amazed how much they didn’t know about agriculture. Some didn’t even know milk comes from a cow. Through interacting with these kids, I realized I had taken this so much knowledge for granted. I also realized that we have a grand tool for spreading the word about agriculture: advocating.

Advocating for agriculture may seem like a daunting task; it doesn’t have to be. Programs like the one I attended can reach a huge audience and make a large impact. However, you can spread the importance of agriculture throughout your daily life and involvement in the Grange. It can be as easy as striking up a conversation with a stranger about where their food comes from. Or it can be more in depth, such as an event in your town set up by your local Grange.

My home Grange hosts a coloring contest for June is Dairy Month with the local library every year. We set up a display in the Children’s Library explaining why dairy products are important. If a child checks out a book, they receive dairy paraphernalia such as erasers from our local dairy association. Kids can then color a dairy related picture that is hung for display in the library. At the end of June, judges choose winners for the contest and we invite them to an awards ceremony. Here, Dairy Princesses present programs and the children are rewarded for their efforts.

This type of event helps promote why a certain branch of agriculture is important in a person’s life. Many adults know that dairy can provide better nutrition to improve health. However, since this event is targeted towards children, the younger generation are able to learn the importance of the dairy industry at an earlier age.

If you do choose to establish an advocacy event, begin by finding a need. You may notice an aspect of agriculture that is misunderstood or is not thought of as important. From this need, you can create a clear message of what you want people to learn from your campaign. Maybe it’s that dairy is a good source of nutrition and therefore the dairy industry is very important. Whatever it is, a clear message will help develop your plan of action down the road.

In addition, identify your audience. Every audience will have a different set of background knowledge and motivators. By narrowing your focus a bit, you can tailor your message to what your audience wants and needs to know. Your audience may already know the basics of agriculture. It might be helpful to bump the intenseness of the information up a notch. But if you want to reach a wider group or one that isn’t as familiar with the topics, keeping it more basic will be helpful.

Your audience also affects what an effective delivery vehicle will look like. Not everyone will find the same type of implementation useful or engaging. In our program, we were tailoring our activities towards children. Because we had this main audience we could choose a specific method of delivering our message that works for kids. In this case, that method happened to be a coloring contest. Even though the children may have been the main audience, we have others as well. Adults who were accompanying the children or even just passers-by would have been able to view our display. Because of this, the display contained pamphlets that were aimed towards both children and adults. Try to think if you would have any secondary audience members. Then you can spread the word to even more people at the same time.

It might seem like there’s a lot to think about when planning an advocacy campaign. You need a message, clear audience, and effective delivery method. And, these aspects will all change based on your situation. However, have a little bit of fun with it. You’ll be engaged while advocating. And if you are, chances are, your audience will be a lot more receptive of your message as well. Even if you decide not to plan a whole event, try sharing your story. Even that one little bit can help a lot of others.