• sjohnson posted an update 1 year ago

    Just wanted everyone to know I got a new shipment of Food for Thought kits. Either e-mail or call me if you want some.

  • sjohnson posted an update 1 year ago

    Just wanted everyone to know I got a new shipment of Food for Thought kits. Either e-mail or call me if you want some.

  • pastpaprez and Profile picture of Charlotte TaylorCharlotte Taylor are now friends 1 year ago

  • pastpaprez posted an update 1 year ago

    Yesterday was the PA State Grange annual Royalty Trip where our Junior and Youth Royalty visit the State Grange office, then go to the capitol, where they met with their legislators before being personally introduced from the floor of the PA Senate. They then headed to Hershey Park to finish out the day.

  • pastpaprez posted an update 1 year ago

    Yesterday was the PA State Grange annual Royalty Trip where our Junior and Youth Royalty visit the State Grange office, then go to the capitol, where they met with their legislators before being personally introduced from the floor of the PA Senate. They then headed to Hershey Park to finish out the day.

  • Tie Dye is something that has come in and out of style through the decades. Just when I think its out, it comes back again. The first time I completed a tie dye project was in art class in middle school. The teacher had multiple vats of dye for the students to dip their rubber-banned shirts into. Same again in 4-H.

    Today, there are kits and multiple ideas on how to tie dye shirts. It’s actually a great activity for Grange youth and juniors. First, the kits give plenty of ideas on how to dye shirts. And, many use spray bottles or squeeze bottles to apply the dye. The benefit is you can leave the shirts absorb more of the dye to make more vibrant colors.

    You can pick up a kit at Wal-Mart or a local craft store. Many offer larger kits for groups. Or go old school and purchase Rit dye, fill containers with the needed tye and water mixture. Go wild.

    Need pattern ideas- check out ideas on Pintrest, Youtube, or through a Google search. It also can go beyond a basic t-shirt. Or for a twist, instead of plain white shirts, make Grange shirts that can be dyed.

    Check out ideas and share your tie-dye creations on our Facebook page.

  • sjohnson and Profile picture of mjmartinmjmartin are now friends 1 year ago

  • We’ll meet June 12th at the Ozawkie United Methodist Church. Program will be by the Youth and Juniors.

  • Easter baskets presented to children at the Willow Domestic Violence Center (shown by members Molly and Mandy):

    image

  • Thumbnail

    If you have ever been tapped to organize a vespers service or Sunday morning inspirational pause, it can either be easy or a challenge.

    These are important because they allow a calming point in the day, […]

  • [caption id="attachment_16" align="alignnone" width="300"]Freeda the Mouse. The official mascot of the National Grange Youth Department. Freeda the Mouse. The official mascot of the National Grange Youth Department.[/caption]

    Greetings Grangers! I hope you all had a great Grange Month, promoting our organization and working on your youth and young adult programs. I was looking through Charlene’s Grange files and came across this poem written by a Granger as a reminder on the power, or value, of one Granger to changing their Grange.

    The Value Of One Member

    Ten little Grangers standing in a line. One disliked the Master, then there were nine.

    Nine ambitious Grangers offered to work late. One forgot her promise, and then there were eight.

    Eight creative Grangers had ideas good as heaven. One lost enthusiasm, then there were seven.

    Seven loyal Grangers got into a fix. They quarreled over projects, then there were six.

    Six Grangers still remained with spirit and drive. One moved away, then there were five.

    Five steadfast Grangers wished that there were more. One became indifferent, then there were four.

    Four cheerful Grangers who never disagree, ‘til one complained of meetings, then there were three.

    Three eager Grangers, what do they do? One got discouraged, then there were two.

    Two lonely Grangers, our rhyme is nearly done. One joined a pep team and then there was one.

    One faithful Granger was feeling rather blue, met with a neighbor, and then there were two.

    Two earnest Grangers each enrolled one more, doubling their number, then there were four.

    Four determined Grangers, just couldn’t wait, ‘til each one won another, then there were eight.

    Eight excited Grangers signed up sixteen more. In six more verses, there’ll be a thousand twenty-four!!

    — Author Unknown

    So have you asked a friend to come to a Grange event? Or helped to develop a new Grange project to impact your community? If so, please let me know – I’d love you to hear your story.Until next time,

     

    Freeda

  • Editor’s Note: Thanks to Michigan State Master Chris Johnston for this post. This first appeared as part of his Master’s Column in the Michigan State Grange’s newsletter, Michigan Grange News.  

    “Since God placed man on earth, agriculture has existed. There is no occupation that precedes it, no order or association that can rank with the tillers of the soil.” Yesterday I spent some time driving around the state and it was made very apparent that farmers throughout southeast Michigan were very content and anxious to be once again doing what they do best and tilling the brown soil from which life is sustained.

    It makes me happy to see that the teachings and lessons of our ritual has been made part of the daily life of the agricultural world. For many years in the beginning of the Grange, we not only worked towards the betterment of rural life, but also for the betterment of production practices. What has now become common to find local farmers around a table drinking coffee in small town America used to be the Grange meetings, where farmers would come to once or twice a month and talk about how they have found a way to increase their yields.
    It has now become the duty of Grange members to work towards increasing the yields of our labors. Whether it be through community service projects or through our legislative connections we have built over the last 140-plus years. While we continue to have a very strong interest in agriculture, we have morphed into an entity larger than just agriculture. We now have taken on such tasks as pushing for the advancement of the 21st century in ways such as broadband internet access to not only the urban but also the rural areas of the country.

    As we continue to work with the legislature to provide the means necessary to accomplish this goal we are, in effect, working towards the betterment of rural America. Since the internet is now used in many agricultural aspects such as directing the farmers in the best way for planting to increase yield, allowing a farmer to have just a portion of a field fertilized as opposed to just blanket fertilizing the entire field. Thus saving money for the farmer and saving money for the consumer.
    With spring in the air and the essence of agriculture all around us, this is an excellent time to refresh our membership of our ritual through the exemplification of the degree work.

     

  • ThumbnailYouth Camp is one of the most popular events for our youth members. And, it’s a challenge to come up with new ideas for activities for these schedules. There are some tried and true events, friendship circles, […]

  • Load More